Hans-Michael Koetzle / Antje Hanebeck: Sonic
Hans-Michael Koetzle / Antje Hanebeck: Sonic
Hans-Michael Koetzle / Antje Hanebeck: Sonic
Hans-Michael Koetzle / Antje Hanebeck: Sonic
Hans-Michael Koetzle / Antje Hanebeck: Sonic
Hans-Michael Koetzle / Antje Hanebeck: Sonic
Hans-Michael Koetzle / Antje Hanebeck: Sonic
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, Hans-Michael Koetzle / Antje Hanebeck: Sonic
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, Hans-Michael Koetzle / Antje Hanebeck: Sonic
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, Hans-Michael Koetzle / Antje Hanebeck: Sonic
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, Hans-Michael Koetzle / Antje Hanebeck: Sonic
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, Hans-Michael Koetzle / Antje Hanebeck: Sonic
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, Hans-Michael Koetzle / Antje Hanebeck: Sonic
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, Hans-Michael Koetzle / Antje Hanebeck: Sonic

Hans-Michael Koetzle / Antje Hanebeck: Sonic

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Volens nolens Antje Hanebeck has enrolled in a grand history of architecture photography. Space, reconstructed space, in her big theme.  Since the mid- 1990s she has been approaching the constructed visions of architects from around the world with photographs. She is doing this as an artist rather than as a photographer. Not with the aim of documenting but with the intention of interpreting. Her medium is the camera, which, however, is the stimulus for new enigmas rather  than explanation. The constructed world as a foil for new ontological issues rather than as a construct. Built, carpentered, wrought, moulded spaces have always intrigued Antje Hanebeck. Viewed against this background, it is more than merely anecdotal that she worked with jewelry and metal design at the start of her career as an artist: creating spaces on a minute scale. The first panel paintings she did at the Munich Academy also explicitly deal with buildings or building-like configurations, such as harbor cranes, whose sculptural appearance Hanebeck has translated into a considered fabric of lines and surfaces. Is photography art? Does photography belong in a museum? The violent controversy surrounding the issue that continued on into the 1980s has been answered very pragmatically by both the market and the institutions. Of course photography is not itself ‘art’. It is a ‘tool’, an aid like a brush, chisel or pencil, a medium that, in an artist’s hand, may well morph into art. At some point in the mid-1990s, Antje Hanebeck laid aside her brush and palette and took up the camera as a new medium for expression suited to a technological age. The buildings she now explores are no longer ‘anonymous sculpture’ but rather the distinguished and often highly controversial creations of architects working on a global scale in a sculptural language of forms that she translates into another, two-dimensional idiom: pictures rather than reproductions.

Hans-Michael Koetzle

Text: Hans-Michael Koetzle, Ulrich Winko
Language: German, English
Size: 30 x 24,5 cm, 128 pages (4 colour and 69 black & white photographs)
Binding: Hardcover
Publisher: Fotohof Editions, 2009